The Guiding Star

The Guiding Star

“SHIPPING.” The Mercury (Hobart, Tas. : 1860 – 1954) 1 Sep 1882

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article9019941

The Guiding Star, which arrived at Melbourne, on Monday, from Hobart, is a Spey-built vessel, and rigged as a three-masted schooner. She discharged a cargo of sugar from Mauritius at Hobart recently, and while there was purchased by Messrs. Facy and Fisher. She is a clipper-looking craft, and very little the worse for the wear, and will be found (says the Argus) very useful in the intercolonial trade, or for making occasional trips to Mauritius or to ports in the East. The schooner after leaving Hobart had northerly winds to Swan Island, and westerly winds thence to the Promontory. On the remainder of the passage easterly winds prevailed.

 

 

 

 

The same Guiding Star being written about 45 Years later.

“THE GUIDING STAR.” The Mercury (Hobart, Tas. : 1860 – 1954) 1 Sep 1927

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article29685625

THE GUIDING STAR

HER LAST VOYAGE FROM HOBART.

The death of Mr. Robert Jones, on August 10 last, removed from our midst a highly respected veteran, writes our Strahan correspondent. For the past twenty years he had been employod by the Strahan Marine Board as signalman in charge of the Macquarie Heads station, and during his long term In that office there was no shipping mishap there. When 18 years of age he went to sea, the captain of the vessel being his own nephew. During his sea experiences he traded to America, Africa. China, England, and the Continent. He was an A.B. In the barquentine Guiding Star, a smart vessel of 249 tons, owned by Messrs. Fisher and Facy, of Hobart, when in 1889 she left Hobart, Captain Ikin in command, and made a smart trip to Mauritius, where she picked up a freight of sugar. While there the cook contracted, yellow fever. The captain did not want to take him aboard, but  the man was so distressed at the thought of being left behind, that he persuaded Captain Ikin to let hin go aboard. The vessel set sail, and a few days later the captain and all the crew were stricken. The vessel drifted helplessly for many days, and the captain, the mate, and the cook died, and were buried at sea. This left the Guiding Star without a navigator, and the crew helpless. In this sorry plight they were discovered by an English trader to the East When the trader hove in sight one of the crew, Frank Jost crawled to the flag halyard and hoisted the distress signal, and the trader lowered a boat and boarded the Guiding Star. The mate and a few of the crew of the English trader took the Guiding Star to Batavia, where the crew were cared for in hospital. The Guiding Star, with her cargo, was sold, and did not return to Tasmania. Two of the crew became Insane, and the others, except Mr. Jones, never regained normal health.

And a contemporary report of the same incident.

“THE GUIDING STAR.” The Mercury (Hobart, Tas. : 1860 – 1954) 22 Jul 1890

THE GUIDING STAR. – CREW DISABLED BY FEVER.

MASTER. MATE, STEWARD, AND ONE SAILOR DEAD.

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article12700260

Messrs. Facy and Fisher have been apprised by cablegram from Batavia of the safety of their barquentine Guiding Star. She left Mauritius on the 7th May, and her non-arrival had caused much anxiety. All doubts as to the safety of the vessel are now set at rest. She is anchored at Anjer, near Batavia. But the cause of putting into that port was an outbreak of fever, which totally disabled the crew. Captain J. Ikin succumbed, the mate, IsaacLear ; the steward, Williams ; and one seaman was also struck down by the fell disease. Tossing about with no one to control her movements, she was sighted by the ship Lancefield, and conveyed in safety to the port. The following are copies of the cable grams received by the owners, delayed no  doubt by the breakage in the wires:- ” BATAVIA, July 11.-Guiding Star anchored near Batavia. Captain, mate, steward, and one sailor dead. ” Then comes a second one from a mercantile house, date Batavia, July 16.-“Guiding Star arrived. Master, mate, steward, and one sailor dead. Rest of crew disabled. Saved by ship Lancefield.”

The one absorbing topic in Hobart for the past three weeks has been the non-arrival of the Guiding Star. The news received yesterday spread an awful gloom over the place, and was a terribly unpleasant ending to the speculation which had taken place. Hope as to the vessel’s safety was held until the Helen’s arrival on Sunday last, when fore- bodings of a disaster occupied most minds. It was generally supposed that if anything delayed the vessel it would be fever, as Captain Ikin was always recognised as an able master, and the barquentine a staunch little vessel, well able to cope with the gales usually experienced between Mauritius and   Hobart. For some time past heavy gales have prevailed in the region of Mauritius, chiefly from the south-west and north-west, but with a vessel fairly light those could hardly be expected to cause a delay. The aocount of the voyage of the schooner Johanna, which arrived at Fremantle from Port Louis, Mauritius, on July 9, perhaps served to some in Hobart as a forerunner of what might be expected of the Guiding Star. On the Johanna two persons, the mate andthe captain’s wife, were left to work the vessel, but it is quite probable that a morefearful story may yet have to be told of the suffering on board the Guiding Star, seeing that all on board were stricken down with the fever. Mauritius fever is a disease easily con- tracted in that island, and is quick in its results. The Guiding Star left Hobart lost on the 11th February for Adelaide, and arrived there on the 17th of the same month. She sailed for Mauritius on the 8th March, and arrived atPort Louis on the 17th April. A cargo of sugar was shipped there, and a departure was taken for this port on the 7th May. The course the barque Helen took on her last trip was between Amsterdam and Paul Islands, the former being about 40 miles to north and the latter about 20 miles to the south. Something like the same route would in all probability be taken by the Guiding Star. Concerning the vessel which fell in with the barquentine, the following information has been obtained :-In the Mercantile Navy List there are two sailing vessels bearing the name of Lance-field, there descriptions being-Lancefield, of London; barque, built at Govan in 1855. Tonnage 1,106 tons, owned by the China Navigation Co., Limited, London. The second Lancefield is registered at Moncton, N.B. and her tonnage is 994. She is also a barque and was built at Moncton in 1881. A small steamer called the Lancefield also appears on the list. She was built at Govan in 1861, and her place of registry is Malta. There is every probability that the Lancefield referred to in the cablegram is the vessel owned by the China Navigation Co.   The Shipping Gazette states that the Lancefield left New York on March 7 for Hong Kong. Her course would be via the Cape of Good Hope, and in three months she might be expected to be crossing the route   of the Guiding Star. The Lancefield sent men on the barquentine to work her, and the smaller vessel was taken to Anjer, near Batavia, Java. Anjer is an open roadstead on the Strait of Sunda, through which the Lancefield would pass on her journey to Hong Kong. When the barquentine sailed from Hobart for Adelaide her crew consisted of 10, their names being Joshua Ikin, captain, aged 53 ; Isaac Lear,-mate, aged 44; Henry Brown,boatswain, aged 39; Louis Williams, cook and steward, aged 43; Thomas Goldring, A.B.aged 27; August Kirchott, A.B., aged 35: Alexander Murray, A.B., aged 28;   John Jost, A.B., aged 32; Joseph Richard, A.B., aged 41 ; Robert Jones, A.B., aged 37. Captain Ikin, as a master, and also as a private individual, was greatly respected and his sad end is greatly regretted here. He was born at Hobart, and served his time as shipwright in McGregor’s yard. After being in various vessels he was employed as carpenter on the schooner Harp, being with her when she was wrecked. His next vessel was the brig Wild Wave, formerly the China, on which he served for many years as mate. He was then appointed to the command of the brigantine Annie, and subsequently the Guiding Star. He was wrecked   at Bird island twice; once on the Harp, and again on the Annie. From the Harp he made a boat passage to Brisbane, the North Queensland ports being then not in the hands of Europeans. That  was about the year 1860. In 1883 the Annie broke from her moorings and became  a total wreck on a reef near Bird Island.  Resort had again to be made to the boats,  and on that occasion he arrived at Rockhampton. He leaves a widow and four children, the eldest being a youth of about 20 years of age. The mate Lear was born at Hobart, his father being in business as a  xxxxxxxv. He served an apprenticeship with Wiseman, saddler; now in Auckland.He then entered the whaling trade, the last vessel on which be was engaged was Aladdin, on which he occupied the xxxx chief officer and navigator. He was then mate of the brig Fairy Rock,   and was on the deck of the Camilla. and when China he served with Captains xxxxx and Milford MacArthur,   31st December being on that vessel when she was wrecked at the Pyramid Rock on the 31st December.

Evans and Co., and Pet,and the xxxxx He later on joined the barquetine, Guiding Star.. He also leaves a widow and six children; the eldest of them being a girl of about 15 years of age. Louis Williams, the third, whose name has arrived as one who has succumbed to the foul disease was also married and leaves in addition to his widow, four childen, the eldest a girl aged 26 years. He was in Messrs Facey and Fisher’s employ for over 20 years and was looked upon as a faithful and able servant. The name of the sailor who died has not yet been transmitted. Most of the sailors, if not all, are unmarried, but it is   difficult to obtain information as to them.;   The Guiding Star was built at Banff in November, 1869, ‘her dimensions being :   Length, 117ft.; breadth, 25.5ft;; depth, 13.4ft.

Her tonnage was 249. James Smith is recorded as being her first master. The Guiding Star’s first visit to Hobart was after a voyage from Mauritius, when she was in command of James Smith, son of the owner. That voyage occupied 37 days, and was marked by rough weather, everything movable being carried away, the skylights and companion smashed, and the cabin filled with water. Although that was her first voyage to Hobart she had been to Australian ports, running there from Cape Town and Mauritius, and had also visited many other parts of the world. In July, 1832, Messrs. Facy and Fisher purchased her, and since then the has traded between intercolonial ports, making also voyages to Fiji, Noumea and Long Island, with the last fatal trip to Mauritius. Heavy salvage is claimed on behalf of the Lancefield. Nothing is known yet as to how the Guiding Star will be brought to Hobart, but it will be decided probably in a few days. Flags were half-masted yesterday out of respect to the deceased seamen.

And another

“THE GUIDING STAR.” Launceston Examiner (Tas. : 1842 – 1899) 21 Jul 1890

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article39552224

THE GUIDING STAR. Our Hobart correspondent telegraphed last evening :- The bark Helen, which arrived from Mauritius to-day, having left Port Louis 35 days after the Guiding Star, brings no tidings of that vessel. There appears to be an unnecessary amount of anxiety displayed concerning the non arrival of the barkentine Guiding Star which has been daily expected at Hobart for some time past from Mauritius with a cargo of sugar. The vessel (says the Tasmanian News) left Mauritius on May 7 with only 300 tons of sugar as cargo. whilst her carrying capacity is equal to 450 tons. The past couple of months are probably the worst in the year for making voyages from Mauritius, as the prevailing winds, when running the Easting down, are light from north- east to south-east, which would be decidedly contrary to the progress of the vessel. Additional colour is lent to the Star having met with adverse weather from the fact that vessels bound for Fremantle from Mauritius have made passages extending ever 70 days, whilst another vessel from the meridian of the Cape to Cape Otway was 78 days on the voyage. These facts show pretty conclusively that the anxiety for the Star should not be so great as appears to be the case, and from tho opinion of those connected with seafaring ways   we have little doubt that the vessel is safe, and may be expected to put in an appearance at any moment. Captain Ikin is well known to be a careful skipper, and from the fact that the Star was in little more than ballast trim when she left Port Louis, and having to beat against head winds, would not be able to make much progress. One of the longest passages yet made to Hobart was done by the Letitia, brig, consigned to Messrs W Crosby and Co., and it is a noteworthy fact that herpassage was made at exactly the some period of the year as this trip of the Star. The Letitia arrived here on her 77th day. An unfortunate error of judgment on Saturday evening caused the lose of the ketch Windward, a well-known trader from the North West Coast to intercolonial ports, and an occasional caller at Launceston. She was towed down the Tamar by the s.s. Cambria, and soon after casting off struck on the Hebe Reef and became a total wreck. All hands were saved and are at the Low Head pilot station. The ketch belonged to Mr Lee, of Duck River, and it is not yet known whether she was in- sured. A full account of the disaster will befound in another column.

 

The Singapore Free Press and Mercantile Advertiser (1884-1942), 23 April 1931

Newspaper Article – THE PLAGUE SHIP  Last survivor of the voyage of death tells of sea horror

Unfortunately The Singapore Free Press retain rights to this article & it cannot be reproduced or transcribed without payment.

 

 

http://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz

A FEVER-POISONED SHIP.

The Hobart Mercury of Oct 29th contains a statement by Alexander Murray, A.B., one of the crew of the barquentine Guiding Star, on a miserable and fatal voyage from Mauritius for Hobart, Murray having arrived at Hobart the previous day from Batavia by steamer. The Guiding Star, captain Ikin (both ship and master known in Timaru), went to Port Louis, Mauritius, with a load of flour from Adelaide, to return to Hobart with sugar. Murray commenced Mb narration by mentioning an incident of Mauritius weather : — ” By the way, I might tell you that while we were at Port Louis au enormous waterspout collided with one of the mountains near that place. Bursting, the water came down the creeks in floods, carrying everything movable before it. – Our vessel came in for such a share of casks of molasses and other merchandise and water rolling down the wharf on to us, that Captain Ikin moored the ship some distance off. After the rush had ceased, we were berthed a short distance from the wharf, while divers were engaged fishing up the sunken goods. The cargo of sugar was then shipped by means of boats.” He then proceeded to describe the sufferings of the crew from Mauritius fever, which, in the island itself, is lightly regarded. A local paper says :- ” A minute after the most violent attack we do not even think about it. We content ourselves by taking quinine, and continue to go about our business. The whole community is’ so familiarised with the fever that no one will admit that he is attacked by the disease.” Murray stated : I was the first to be attacked by the fever, a few days before we sailed from Port Louise. Captain Ikin told me to go and see a doctor, which I did. The captain pressed me to return on the vessel, saying ” Come home with me, you will not be comfortable in Mauritius.” Of course I went with him. As soon as we set sail I returned to my bunk, very bad indeed, and after we had made a start I got worse and worse until my reason began to leave me. I knew very little of what was going on. The captain was very good to me, and doctored me with quinine. The next I can remember is one of the men telling me that the steward had been found dead in his bunk. Then one morning I was told Louis Williams tbe second mate was dead. He bad only been ill a few days. It cast an awful gloom over us when our mate’s burial took place. The captain said, as the body went over the side, “God bless his soul, he has been a good man.” Captain Ikin next fell ill, and the word was passed around “The old man’s queer.” He died after being ill about a week. All the crew had done what they could for him. He died on a Sunday. We had no prayer-book and when he was buried the only words used by the men were ” God rest. his soul. Amen.” Though the skipper was dead we had no misgivings about the safety of the vessel, for the mate attended to the navigation. But after Captain Ikin’s death Mr Lear began to show signs of the fever, and as it got a proper hold of him he bad to give up work. He died some twelve days after the captain. I had been very ill all this time, just able to crawl, but from now began to mend slowly. There was no one left to navigate, and we steered E.N.E. to reach Western Australia. Soon after Mr Lear’s death, Kirchoff, a foreigner, ordinary seaman, took sick and died in a few days. There were then only six of us to work the vessel, but we did fairly well by keeping few sails on, and heaving-to every night to et rest. After Kirchoff died Jones, Goldring, and Richards took it, and did not recover before the Lancefleld picked us up. Then there were only three men able to do anything. If the mate had lived we would have brought the ship home, but as it was we did not know where we were making for. One morning, a ship appeared in sight to the windward, bearing in our direction. We kept the Guiding Star to until the stranger came on us about dark. We hove-to as usual all night, and the other vessel kept by us. Next morning a boat was put off, and the mate of the Lancefield, that being the name of the barque, boarded our vessel. We told him the state of affairs, and he said, “I can’t leave you in this distress. I must go on board again and tell the captain.” Presently he returned with coat and provisions, and asked if we were agreeable to go to Anjer with him, and we answered ” Yes.” I was feeling bad again, and we were only too glad to have any assistance offered. The mate and two men off the Lancefleld came on the Guiding Star to help to work her. After that Brown, our boatswain, went down with the fever. Jost kept at work well. The barquentine was kept under topsails until we got flne weather, when everything was crowded on, and we soon made Anjer, arriving there shortly after the Lancefleld. We were taken off the ship at Anjer, and sent to Batavia, and the Guiding Star was taken to the same place by a Malay crew. Four of us went to tho Hospital. I was in the institution 14 days. I went on board tho vessel one day, but had to lay up again in the Hospital for 10 days. The barquentine made a fresh start with Richards on board and a Javanese crew, Jones, Brown, and myself being in the Hospital. The fever broke out again on board and the ship had to put back to Batavia. Another start was made with a fresh crew, but she had to return to Anjer, owing to another appearance of the fever. Richards caught it bad again, and was taken to the hospital. I came away in the Woodonga with two others leaving the other three ill at Batavia. A private letter from Hobart of later date than the foregoing says :— “A cablegram came to hand advising of the total wreck of a vessel, evidently the Guiding Star, 100 miles from Anjer, from which port she sailed. Nothing more has been heard although the owners have wired for further information.”

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article12706682

“GUIDING STAR DISASTER.” The Mercury (Hobart, Tas. : 1860 – 1954) 29 Oct 1890

GUIDING STAR DISASTER.

‘ A SURVIVOR INTERVIEWED.

Alexander Murray, A.B., one of the crew of the barquentine Guiding Star, on the voyage from Mauritius for Hobart, arrived in town yesterday Morning from Batavia. After interviewing Captain Fisher he located himself at the Central Hotel, where a representative of this paper waited on him and gleaned a few details concerning the trip so full of disaster.

First, as to yourself, Mr. Murray? Well, I was born at London, but have resided for some years in Tasmania, sailing out of Hobart in various vessels, amongst which were the Natal Queen, Pet, and Guiding Star. From London I sailed in the Westbury and Berean. I have no wife or family. Will you tell me shortly what occurred after your arrival at Port Louis? Yes. As you perhaps know we had a cargo of flour from Adelaide, which we commenced to discharge on arrival. By-the-way, I might tell you that while we were at Port Louis an enormous waterspout collided with one of the mountains near that place. Bursting, the water came down the creeks in floods, carrying everything moveable before it. Our vessel came in for such a share of casks of molasses and other merchandise and water rolling down the wharf on to us, that Capt Ikin moored the ship some distance off. After the rush had ceased, we wore berthed a short distance from the wharf, while divers were engaged fishing up the sunken goods. The cargo of sugar was then shipped by means of boats. Who was first attacked by the fever on board the vessel ? I was ; a few days before we left Port Louis. First, I had a bad headache, and then my legs swelled until at last I had to give in, as I could neither work nor walk. Captain Ikin told me to go and see a doctor, which I did, and he said I had the fever. The captain pressed me to remain on the vessel, saying Come home with me, you will not be comfortable in Mauritius.” Of course I went with him. As soon as we set sail I returned to my bunk, very bad indeed.

Was the fever very prevalent while yon were at Mauritius? Not so far as I knew. After we had made a start on our voyage I got worse and worse until my reason began to leave me. I know very little of »hat was going on. The poor captain was very good to mo, gave mo all I required, and doctored me with quinine, which is the only specific

for Mauritius as for all ‘intermittent fevers. The next incident I can remembor is one of the men telling me that the steward bad been found dead in his bunk. I think it was Goldring who came to me one morning about 8 o’clock and said, ” Louis’ dead.” We did not expect him to go then, as he had only been iII a few days. I did not see Louis Williams during his illness. It cast an awful gloom over us when our mate’s burial took place. The captain said, as the body went over the side, ” God bless his soul, he has been a good man.” Following Williams’ death came Captain Ikin’s illness, the first news I had of it being from some of the forecastle hands, who said, ” The old man’s queer.” I said, ” Perhaps he has got the fever,” but they did not think so. I was right, however, for he died in about a week’s time. All that time I was lying in my bunk suffering, but I did not like the captain to go off without seeing him so I asked to be allowed to do so. Mr. Lear, the mate, assisted me to go aft, and I saw the master there, perfectly unconscious, looking exceedingly well, but we knew be was dying. All the crew had done what they could for him. He passed away on a Sunday and the crew buried his remains. We had no prayer-book and performed no special burial service, the only words used by the men being ” God rest his soul. Amen.” Though the skipper was dead we had no misgivings about the safety of the vessel, for the mate attended to the navigation. Bultafter Captain Ikin’s death Mr Lear began to show signs of the fever, and as it got a proper hold of him he had to give up work. He succumbed some 12 days after the captain. I was just able to move about the forecastle a little, being still very bad. When the mate died his body was carried on to the poop to be sewed up in canvas. I managed to crawl to the door of the forcastle to have a look at the corpse, and saw the men at work on the shroud. Such sights and surroundings were not by any moans conducive to my recovery, but I felt strength returning slowly.

How did you manage to navigate the vessel? We steered in a direction almost E.N.E., which we thought would bring us on to Western Australia. After Mr. Lear’s death August Kirchoff, a foreigner and stranger to us, one of the ordinary seaman, was first confined to his bunk, and he died a few days after being attacked. We tried to bring St Paul’s Island to get our bearing but could not do so. There were now only six of us to work the vessel, and we did fairly well under the circumstances. Keeping the ship under topsails and fore-staysail we were not hampered much, although we had some rather dirty weather as we neared Cape Leeuwin. Anybody kept watch during the day, but at night we had to heave the vessel to and take watch by turns. Occasionally we had to take down the upper topsails.’ Of course we hove-to at night to get the rest we all required.

When did the other members of the crew lie down to the fever? After Kirchoff died Jones, Goldring, and Richards took it, and did not recover before the Lancefield picked us up. Our numbers were thus reduced to three. If the mate had lived we would have brought the ship home, but as it was we did not know where we were making for. Driving along as we were at a fair pace one morning, a ship appeared in sight to the westward, bearing in our direction. We kept the Guiding Star to until the stranger came on us about dark. We remained hove-to as usual all night, and the other vessel kept by us. Next morning a boat was put off, and the mate of the Lancefield, that being the name of the barque, boarded our vessel. In answer to his questions we told him the state of affairs, and he answered, ” I can’t leave you in this distress. 1 must go on board again and tell the captain.” Presently he returned with coal and provisions, and asked if we were agreeable to go to Anjer with him, and we answered “Yes.” I was feeling bad again, and we were only too glad to have any assistance offered. The mate and two men off the Lancefield came on the Guiding Star to help to work her, after which Brown, our boatswain, was down with the fever. Jost kept at work well. The barquentine was kept under topsails until we got finer weather, when everything was crowded on, and we soon made Anjer, arriving there shortly after the Lancefield.

What followed when you arrived at Anjer? We were sent to Batavia, and the Guiding Star was taken to the same place , by a Malay crew which the pilot took on board with him. Four of us went to the Hospital, Brown, Jones, Richards, and myself. I was in the Institution 14 days. Went on board the vessel one day, but had to lay up again in the Hospital for 16 days. Jones was in 12 days the first time and 16 the second, while Richards was an inmate for 12 days, but just before the vessel finally left he ‘went in again. The barquentine made a first start with Richardson board and a Javanese crew, Jones, Brown, and myself being in the Hospital. The fever broke out again on board amongst the crew and the ship had to put back to Batavia. Another start was made with a fresh crew, but she had to return to Anjer owing to another appearance of the fever. Richards was a victim, and was convoyed again to the Military Hospital at Batavia, whore I left him very

bad. He was a Frenchman.

Where did you go after leaving the hospital? To the Sailors’ Home until the s,s. Wodonga was ready to take us away. Brown, Jones, and myself sailed in her for Sydney, afterwards coming to Launceston by the Corinna and train to Hobart.

Where is Jones? In the Sydney Hospital. Brown I left at Launceston, and I expect him down by the express tonight The remainder of the crew were at Batavia when I left, all more or loss ill.

MAURITIUS FEVER.

With reference to the fever which has proved so fatal in its results it may be stated it never assumed an epidemic form until after 1864. In Mauritius, according to a recent paper published on that island, the malady is lightly regarded. The journal says:-“A minute after the most violent attack we do not even think about it. We content ourselves by taking quinine, and continuing to go about our business. The whole community is so familiarised with the fever that no one will admit that he is attacked by the disease.” The reason assigned by the same paper for the spread of fever is the disappearance of the rain owing to the forests being cut down, overcrowding, adulteration of articles of food, and the want of proper control over Asiatic traders. A suggestion was appended that the poor law establishments of the island should be reconstituted on a fresh basis.

“SUPPOSED WRECK OF THE GUIDING STAR.” The Mercury(Hobart, Tas. : 1860 – 1954) 1 Nov 1890

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article12706898

SUPPOSED WRECK OF THE GUIDING STAR

Captain T. M. Fisher, of the firm of Facy and Fisher, received the following message yesterday from Weltovreden : -” Gending Star encountered heavy gale ; total wich ashore one hundred miles from Anjer ; sent assistance; hope save cargo: no loss life.” As the Guiding Star left Anjer on the 25th ult, It is probable that she is the vessel referred to in the above cablegram. The word “wich” is supposed to be a mutilation in transit of  “wreck,” Captain Fisher applied to have the message repeated, but had not received anything further up till midnight.

“WRECK OF THE GUIDING STAR.” Launceston Examiner (Tas. : 1842 – 1899) 4 Nov 1890

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article39558330

WRECK OF THE GUIDING STAR. Our Hobart correspondent telegraphed last evening :-Further confirmation of the telegram reporting the lose of the barkentine Gulding Star was received today by Mr T. M. Fisher. She encountered a gale a hundred miles from Anjer and became a total wreck. No lives were lost, and an attempt was to be made to save the cargo.

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