Dispatch

Now positively identified as the Speybuilt ship ‘Dispatch’, here is a photo of one of the Purton Hulks on the banks of River Severn. http://www.friendsofpurton.org.uk/Vessels/Dispatch.htm

Bronze Age Grave

 Travellers on the Garmouth to Elginhill road during mid-April must
have been puzzled to see a group of people digging or standing around
in a ploughed field on the east side of Bin Hill. It can now be
revealed that these were a team of professional archaeologists
excavating a Bronze age burial site. The 4,000 year old burial had
gradually been exposed…

History of the Water Tower

Garmouth Water Tower The water tower was built in 1898-9 to distribute water to the people of Garmouth, Kingston and District, and is a Category C listed building    The official description reads a “circular 2-stage cement rendered tower with conical slate roof”.     The water came from a reservoir high up on the Fochabers Burn, at a point higher than the Garmouth tower.  The water flowed by gravitation through a 4-inch pipe under the Fochabers road bridge, and on to the Garmouth tower, to fill two cisterns, upper and lower, within the body of the tower.   Inside the tower there were […]

The Water Tower, a recent history

Built in the 1890’s, the tower is an early example of 19th century concrete construction.

This Category C Listed building stands in a prominent position above the village and has graced Garmouth’s skyline for more than 100years. Though no longer used as a reservoir to improve the water supply to both villages, it has been retained as a landmark on one of the most spectacular viewpoints of the area. Information boards highlight local and historical features and the ground surrounding the benches is planted with indigenous wild flowers.

Water Tower Background

Built in the 1890’s, the tower is an early example of 19th century concrete construction. This Category C Listed building stands in a prominent position above the village and has graced Garmouth’s skyline for more than 100years.

Though no longer used as a reservoir to improve the water supply to both villages, it has been retained as a landmark on one of the most spectacular viewpoints of the area. Information boards highlight local and historical features and the ground surrounding the benches is planted with indigenous wild flowers.

Shipbuilding on the Spey

The village of Kingston was once the centre of a thriving shipbuilding industry which sent its products all over the world. It owes its name to one of the original shipbuilders, William Osbourne of Kingston-upon-Hull. He and his partner, Ralph Dodsworth of York, purchased the forest of Glenmore from the Duke of Gordon in 1784. Timber was floated down the Spey to Garmouth where it was shipped south.